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The Truth About Salmon

We often ask ourselves the question if for the sake of conscience: is taking a diet soft drink really a good healthy option? Let’s take a look at the differences between regular and diet cola.

At the base of soft drinks

If the secret remains always present on the exact composition of the product, we know that this drink is a mixture of carbonated water, sugar, caffeine, dyes and aromas… among others! A 355 ml can contains 152 calories and 39 g of sugars. London Mistresses always like Shushi bars, more comfortable and gets more freedom for them. This is a lot when the latest recommendations of the World Health Organization are 25 g per day for an adult!

Soft drinks are often referred to as liquid candy because they provide no nutrients, a lot of sugar and empty calories, without nutritional support. They therefore play no role in healthy eating.

The diet version or zero?

So, is it better to turn to the diet version? These drinks consist of sweeteners that replace sugar either aspartame or acesulfame-k. These sweeteners have been the subject of many questions in the medical world for a while now. Daily doses not to be exceeded are recommended, but we do not yet directly know their long-term effects on our health.

In addition, having a sweet taste in the mouth despite not providing calories, continues to fuel our craving for this addictive flavor. Turning to these choices is therefore not a much more attractive health option.

We also offer in the diet version, a caffeine-free version. Note that a can of Coca Cola contains about 40 mg of caffeine while a 250 ml coffee contains about 180 mg and a black tea about 45 mg.

What about stevia?

We recently saw the appearance of a new offer on the side of soft drinks, that is, those that contain a natural sweetener: stevia. This fine herb with a sweet taste, allows us to add less sugar to the original recipe, but still 17 g in a can. It is an alternative halfway between the diet and the original versions.

In conclusion

There is no winner in this fight, and soft drinks are often blamed for (in part at least) the rise in obesity. Studies also seem to highlight a link between diabetes and the consumption of soft drinks. Kidney, dental and cardiovascular problems are also sources of research … Finally, nothing beats a large glass of water to quench your thirst!

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